Mice In Air Ducts: Why You Hear Scratching And How To Get Rid Of Them

Have you been hearing some scratching noises coming from your vents? Most likely, it’s a mouse. Mice in air ducts are not only a nuisance, but they may also be dangerous. When they run about in the ducts, they finally die, causing an unpleasant stench. If you observe any scratching or scrabbling in your ducting, you most certainly have a mouse infestation. The good news is that you can get rid of mice in your air ducts. To get rid of the infestation, you may either hire a professional pest control firm or attempt some do-it-yourself solutions. In any case, getting rid of mice in your air ducts is essential for keeping your house clean and healthy.

What Are The Dangers Of Mice In Air Ducts?

Mice running around in your air ducts is not only a nuisance but may also present some dangers to you and your family. For instance, when these rodents eventually die inside the ductwork, they begin to decompose and release a nauseating smell throughout the house. Additionally, as the mice run through the ductwork, they tear up the insulation and contaminate it with their urine and droppings. This insulation will need to be replaced once the mice are gone to protect against drafts and heat loss. Also, if you have small children or pets, they may be able to reach into the vents and pull out the contaminated insulation, which can cause health problems if ingested. Moreover, if you have allergies or asthma, having mice in air ducts can trigger an attack due to the presence of their dander and hair inside the vents. 

How To Get Rid Of Mice In Air Ducts?

There are two ways that you can get rid of mice in your air ducts: by hiring a professional pest control company or by attempting some do-it-yourself solutions. If you decide to go with a professional company, they will first inspect your vents to determine how big the infestation is and then seal off all entry points that the mice are using to get into the ductwork. Next, they will set up traps inside the vents to catch any mice that are still inside and then remove them from your home. Finally, they will clean out all of the contaminated insulation and replace it with new insulation. 

If you decide to try some do-it-yourself solutions, there are several things that you can do to get rid of mice in your air ducts. First, locate all of the entry points that the mice are using to get into the ductwork and seal them off using steel wool or caulk. Next, set up traps inside the vents so that you can catch any remaining mice. Finally, remove all of the contaminated insulation and replace it with new insulation yourself. While this process may seem daunting, it is possible to do it yourself if you have some time and patience. 

Mice in air ducts are not only a nuisance but may also be dangerous because they can release a nauseating smell throughout your house when they die and their urine and droppings can contaminate your insulation. If you think that you might have a mouse infestation in your air ducts, it is important to take action right away so that you can protect yourself and your family from potential health hazards. There are two ways that you can get rid of mice in air ducts: by hiring a professional pest control company or by attempting some do-it-yourself solutions. Both methods require sealing off entry points into your ductwork, setting up traps for remaining mice, and removing/replacing contaminated insulation; however, depending on your comfort level with taking on this project yourself, one method may be better suited for you than another. No matter which method you choose, taking care of this problem as soon as possible is essential for maintaining a clean and healthy home environment.”

We offer air duct and dryer vent cleaning services in the Greater Sudbury area. Call or text  today for a free estimate at 705-996-4553

 

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